1. 1

    DRM crap is annoying. I hope it dies with Bookiza so that both writers and readers could be benefited.

    1. 1

      imo, it’s good to know how React and Vue work, what is state management in general but choose the stack carefully without succumbing to ‘bay area hype.’ i mean understand the tool instead of being one.

      1. 1

        It does not have to be ‘to own’ because web changes the nature of distribution. In fact the idea ‘to own’ is closer to Tsundoku [1] than actual reading, and that is a bad thing.

        A good corollary to look at, though not perfect, would be a blogpost.

        No one other than the original writer owns the blogpost they have written. Both the copyright and right to distribute it online. We all get to read the post because the author chooses to publish, distribute and broadcast it on the open web through their friends and networks. I never get to ‘own’ their post but I appreciate reading it.

        So what’s important here is that the authors never have to give their rights away for distribution. The machinery is cheap and available immediately. Some writers even make money off of it, but then intermediaries come into the picture again. It is just that the power to own the titles and control the distribution doesn’t concentrate over to a handful of greedy folks who later use that clout to influence public policy.

        I think we need a new model for books on web that is similar for books but also one that makes sure that the original author gets to keep the rights to their book. A model that is not a catalyst to boost sales and premium of dead tree books. IMO, we win by making the life of the writer simpler and our own.

        Web can be a great neutral agent for that!

        [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsundoku

        1. 1

          It’s true that most businesses die because they don’t keep up with newer realities of the world but the role of an influential ambitious corp in shaping that future through lobbying and tipping laws in their favor cannot be denied. I mean Amazon did take away the .book TLD for example!

          1. 2

            True that it is not entirely Amazon that’s responsible for waning interest in local bookstores. A bunch have closed or moved away since the day of greater web but quite a few still carry on out there as torchbearers in their local communities. If we can get behind these smaller groups and provide them with open source tools to compete with the ecosystem could be powered back up on its feet. It all depends on how the different vectors align to move forward, and that includes legislation.

          1. 1

            That website doesn’t seem to be opening responsively on my iPhone. Seems like a good event though!

            1. 2

              IMO, there is a significant difference between how information is presented on web and how it is put on the dead-tree—a one-to-one reconciliation of style and presentation isn’t possible. Although I could be wrong about this!

              1. 3

                CSS paged media extensions create the print-based context of pages, kinds of pages for you to work with and PDF specific stuff like bookmarks. Using tools like PrinceXML or Antenna House you then generate the corresponding PDF.

                I wouldn’t want a one-to-one reconciliation because, to me, PDF is more for reading offline in paper than it is reading online in a screen. That said there are a lot of things that you can do on the web that you can also do in a PDF document.

                1. 1

                  Is there a study on how many people choose to read content offline by printing to PDF or on physical paper vs. on url itself? I mean we know that the number of people who read a blog online far exceeds the number of people who end up downloading/printing it before reading.

                  1. 2

                    People can’t easily print content so why would they try? Not even the browsers default stylesheets account for printing. Also, note that books and long-form text are a completely different monster

                    I used to print sections from Safari (when I was subscribed) to have next to me when working in code so I wouldn’t have to switch tabs or browsers when looking for a specific thing.

                    As to your specific question, no… I don’t know if there are studies about people printing blogs for offline reading. As far as books are concerned, the only element I found was about O’Reilly going for PDF rather than epub or MOBI

              1. 2

                Compare this to open MS Word / Google Docs → Create PDF. Simple. :-)

                1. 1

                  I know! No matter how hard I try, my sensibilities of a book aren’t able to reconcile with the idea of PDF as book. I know a lot of people rely on PDF for distribution, but to me PDF is and will always remain a dork.

                  I’d rather buy dead-tree despite the cost and the fact that I prefer digital for almost everything else.

                1. 1

                  Kitchen Confidential sounds like an interesting read. :-)

                  1. 2

                    The article from New Yorker suggests that SEO is still king and real readers find articles of their interest via search. Nothing has changed!

                  1. 2

                    There’s a lot to happen in the space of books and art starting this year. Which is a huge win for all of us, yay!